Adventures in
Kenya

Kenya Tours

Take a Kenya adventure tour to experience the big 5 game in East Africa. Nairobi is the busy capital and the gateway to East Africa with many interesting things to do. Kenya boasts many world famous national parks, our tours will visit the Masai Mara and Lake Nakuru national parks. Here you will see a plethora of stunning wildlife up-close which may include leopards, lions, zebra, buffalo, elephant and rhino; make sure your camera memory card is ready to go!

Kenya is also the starting point of the great migration where massive herds of wildebeest, zebra and gazelles make their annual walk to find greener pastures. Our Kenya adventure tours travel along the top of the Great Rift Valley where we can admire the spectacular views along the way before dropping down into the valley itself. Lake Navaisha is a great place to view hippos or take an optional visit to Hells Gate National Park by bicycle. Of course no Kenya adventure tour is complete without meeting the friendly local people and we get the chance to visit a Masai village to observe their traditional way of life.

Featured Tours

All Tours of Kenya

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AFSZ
Route: Nairobi to Stone Town
Code:
AFSZ
Days:
9
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$1,879
From:
US$1,597
+ local payment US$570
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AFMS
Route: Nairobi to Arusha
Code:
AFMS
Days:
10
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$2,069
From:
US$1,758
+ local payment US$570
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BXABB
Route: Nairobi to Dar es Salaam
Code:
BXABB
Days:
11
Style: Adventures for 20s and 30s
On Sale! US$899
From:
US$764
+ local payment US$280
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AFKN
Route: Kigali to Nairobi
Code:
AFKN
Days:
11
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$1,669
From:
US$1,418
+ local payment US$470
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AFKR
Route: Nairobi to Nairobi
Code:
AFKR
Days:
12
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$1,969
From:
US$1,673
+ local payment US$590
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AFRM
Route: Kigali to Nairobi
Code:
AFRM
Days:
13
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$2,139
From:
US$1,818
+ local payment US$680
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AFSB-01
Route: Nairobi to Stone Town
Code:
AFSB
Days:
13
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$2,539
From:
US$2,158
+ local payment US$780
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AFEA
Route: Nairobi to Nairobi
Code:
AFEA
Days:
14
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$2,429
From:
US$2,064
+ local payment US$800
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BXASZ
Route: Nairobi to Dar es Salaam
Code:
BXASZ
Days:
15
Style: Adventures for 20s and 30s
On Sale! US$1,059
From:
US$900
+ local payment US$310
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BXAGS
Route: Nairobi to Nairobi
Code:
BXAGS
Days:
16
Style: Adventures for 20s and 30s
On Sale! US$989
From:
US$840
+ local payment US$240
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AFET
Route: Kigali to Arusha
Code:
AFET
Days:
18
Style: Worldwide Adventures
On Sale! US$3,379
From:
US$2,872
+ local payment US$1040
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BXANV
Route: Nairobi to Livingstone
Code:
BXANV
Days:
19
Style: Adventures for 20s and 30s
On Sale! US$1,099
From:
US$934
+ local payment US$420
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Kenya Travel Articles, Inspiration & Information

The beauty of the Masai Mara

Imagine that it is 6am, the sun is just rising and your jeep is in the middle of the African Savannah. So many beautiful creatures surround you and this is the perfect time of day to see them. Giraffes and zebra make their way to watering holes where they are joined by elephants, buffalo and even lions!  Read more

Watching the Wildebeest Migration

Travelling has the capacity to open your eyes so wide and show you a world that you may never have imagined existed. For me it’s a compulsion, it’s an improbable and unforeseeable adventure, which excites me immensely. The people, the culture, the scenery, the language, the atmosphere…   Read more

Entering the Masai Mara

The ground ran red as the rain mixed with the dust that had stained our feet only hours earlier forming a rich paste matching the Masai’s clothes. It was a bumpy ride to the Masai Mara, down dirt roads, littered with rocks and holes. Grazing lands rolled out, as far as the eye could see..  Read more

Independently Verified Travel Reviews From Past Clients

Kenya Travel Guide

Kenya Travel Guide

Brief history

Kenya’s proximity to the Arabian Peninsular invited colonisation, and Arab traders frequented the Kenyan coast from the 1st century AD with settlements established by the 8th century. Nilotic and Bantu people moved in to the region during the 1st millennium AD and Bantu people now comprise three quarters of Kenya’s population with Swahili, a Bantu language, being the main language today.

In the 16th Century, the Portuguese arrived with the United Kingdom establishing it’s major influence in the 19th Century. Independence from the British happened on 12 December 1963 and a year later, Jomo Kenyatta became Kenya’s first president. (The International airport in Nairobi is named after him). Today’s president is Uhuru Kenyatta

Geography and weather

Kenya is comparable in size to France, with the climate varying from tropical on the Indian Ocean Coast to arid in the interior. From the coast are low plains that rise to the Central Highlands which in turn are bisected by the Great Rift Valley running from north to south of the country. Mount Kenya is found in the highlands and is the second highest point in Africa (5,199 metres) after Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania (5,895 metres – Uhuru Peak on the Kibo summit).

There are two rainy seasons in Kenya – the long rains from April to June and the short rains from October to December. The rainfall is sometimes heavy and often falls in the afternoons and evenings. The hottest period is from February to March and the coolest in July and August.

If you want to see the annual migration, it usually occurs between June and September.

Visit www.worldclimate.com to get an idea of what the weather will be like on your tour.

Visas

Currently EU, US, Canadian, Australian and New Zealand citizens all need a visa to enter Kenya. It is your own responsibility to check all visa requirements before travelling and obtain them in advance as required. For many nationalities visas can be obtained on the borders however you should contact the embassy for further information.

We have been advised that Kenya is now strictly enforcing a "blank pages, condition of entry", similar to that recently enforced in South Africa. This means that all those requiring a visa to enter Kenya must have at least two blank pages available in their passport upon arrival. Failure to meet this requirement may result in an entry visa being refused. We urge you to make sure your passport meets these conditions.

Visa services like www.travcour.com can be very helpful.

Important: pounds sterling are not accepted at border crossings so bring US dollars cash for any visa expenses at the border.

Border Crossings

Into Kenya from Uganda: Malaba 
From Kenya into Tanzania: Namanga

Money

Please note: It can be very difficult to obtain US dollars in Africa, even in major cities like Cape Town. Many places will not accept any notes that are marked, torn or older than the year 2002, and you may have difficulty exchanging these notes elsewhere in Africa, so please check your cash carefully at the point of purchase.

The monetary unit in Kenya is the Kenyan shilling. For up-to-date exchange rates with your own currency visit www.oanda.com or www.xe.com.

In general, Visa is the only credit card that will work everywhere in Africa. Master Card, AMEX and Cirrus will work in some countries but not in others.

We recommend that you bring cash in US dollars only. When changing money, it is a good idea if at all possible, to get small denomination notes and coins in the local currency as often there is a lack of change when you are making purchases and no-one in Africa ever seems to have change.

Please note that it is not possible to withdraw US dollars from ATMs in Africa, only local currency.

Shopping

Haggling is expected in Kenya and hunting for bargains can be a real highlight. For tips on bargaining and shopping etiquette please see the pre departure information.

Your best buys are soap stone and hard wooden carvings as well as batiks (wall hangings), sarongs, Masaii blankets, hats, and of course tee shirts.

Nairobi city market is good for the above but is becoming expensive so bartering is essential and please beware of pickpockets and scam artists. Once on the road, Naivasha and Nakuru have some good markets and they are generally cheaper than Nairobi and much more relaxing as a place to shop.

Tipping

In most Kenyan restaurants a 10% service charge and a 2% training levy is included on the bill. Always check the bill to make sure and unless you get exceptional service, it is not necessary to give a further tip. Please note there is also VAT added onto all food bills, and this is not always included in the price on the menu. You should take both of these charges into account when reading the menu and check that all taxes are included, as sometimes nearly 30% can be added onto the bill at the end. You do not need to tip taxi drivers but you should tip people who assist you with your luggage at hotels and hostels. (Don’t over-tip US$1.00 - US$1.50 is usually enough). Tipping guides at the end of excursions and treks etc is always appreciated and your tour leader will advise you on the amount for this

Local transport

Taxis are recommended for all journeys within a city. In Kenya, taxi meters are not normally in evidence, so you will find yourself engaging in a bit of haggling with the driver to agree upon the fare. This can be fun, but it is a good idea to find out in advance, from your tour leader or the hotel receptionist, approximately how much the fare should be. You will almost certainly have to accept that you will pay more than the Kenyans do.

Matatus are by far the most common means of transportation in Kenya. They leave from designated spots called stages but only when the matatu is full. Matatus can also be caught from the road. If one is passing, stick out your arm with your palm down. This is the sign you want to be picked up. If the vehicle is not full, the driver will pull over to let you in.

There are at least two people that run every matatu: a driver and a tout. Touts can be very aggressive and rude. Don't let a tout take your bag from you, and make your own decision about which vehicle to take. Never pay for a ticket before you get on a matatu – always board first and ask other customers what they are paying so you don’t get ripped off. It is not recommended to take matatus at night.

Security

Overall, crime is not a great problem in Kenya, but Nairobi does have a reputation for robberies. This does not mean that you should be afraid to leave your hotel, but it does mean that in certain areas of the city you need to exercise caution or avoid them altogether and try to avoid travelling alone after dark. Don’t walk around lonely back streets, especially on your own, don’t wear expensive looking jewellery or a classy watch and don’t carry a wallet in your back pocket. Don’t carry your camera openly; always have it in a small day pack which is firmly attached to your body, preferably in the front in crowded places. Always wear a money belt or leave your valuables, including your passport, in the hotel security box.

Photography

Caution should be taken when taking photos in and around the city. Locals should always be asked prior to taking a photo and it is not uncommon for them to ask for a small donation. Never take photos of police, military personal or buildings. The same goes for any government buildings, banks, post offices or the railway station.

Important: Please do not take photos of the Masaii people without asking their permission. If they agree it is likely that they will expect payment.

Local food and drink

Some meals are included when camping and lunch is usually included on travelling days in the truck. When staying in hotels or hostels, all meals are at your own expense.

Your tour leader will be able to recommend restaurants.

In Kenya the basic diet focuses around chicken, beef or seafood, mostly served with rice, boiled potatoes, Ugali (made from maize flour) and possibly chips or salad. On the coast, dishes are mainly seafood based and this region is also well know for its curry. (A coconut crab curry over looking the Indian Ocean is hard to beat, as are barbequed prawns, tuna or swordfish straight from the sea.) For a quick snack, meat or veggie samosas and chapattis are widely available. Nyama Choma (roast meat) is widely popular and you can find it in every town. Roasted beef or goat meat is either severed on a stick and roasted, or fried and dished up in a plastic or paper bag at the roadside. In restaurants you can try Nyama Choma with Ugali, Saladi (cabbage, onion, carrots, green peppers and chilli all very finely chopped) , local spinach or Irio (seasoned puree of peas, corn and potatoes).

Maize, potatoes, local spinach, carrots, peas, yams and different varieties of beans are Kenya’s main vegetables – particularly around the equator region.

If you are a strict vegetarian you may experience a distinct lack of variety in the food available, especially in small towns. You might find that you are eating a lot of omelettes and other egg dishes. Our tour leaders will do their best to provide interesting vegetarian alternatives when arranging group meals in the campsite, but your patience and understanding is requested.

All drinks such as water, soft or alcoholic drinks are at your own expense at all times.

(All glass bottles taken away from shops in Kenya will have a deposit added on which varies.)

You should be wary of drinking the local tap water. Bottled water, carbonated soft drinks and fruit juices are widely available and are generally safe to drink. Please note however that fruit juices are sometimes made with un-boiled tap water and could upset your stomach.

There are various brands of beers found only in Kenya including Tusker Premium / Export, Pilsner and Citizen. Most of the campsites / hostels that we use have bars or serve alcoholic drinks. If there is not a bar in the campsite / hostel then there is sure to be one within walking distance. Beware imported spirit prices as they are very expensive so always ask for the local equivalent spirit if you want to remain within your budget!

Time Difference

GMT/UTC +3. For other time differences please visit www.timeanddate.com

Voltage

240 volts. Sockets are the British-style three pin.

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